There are several active fires in Tehama County. The power has been shut off for much of Red Bluff and is affecting the District office. During the outage our air quality monitors will be down.  Air quality throughout Tehama County has the potential to reach unhealthy levels due to elevated particulate levels from the wildfires.

Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should avoid prolonged outdoor exertion; everyone else, especially children, should limit prolonged outdoor exertion. The Tehama County Air Pollution Control District advises that these sensitive categories stay indoors and avoid intense physical activity in those areas where high smoke levels are visibly evident.

While all persons may experience varying degrees of symptoms, the more sensitive individuals are at greatest risk at experiencing more aggravated symptoms which may include, but are not limited to coughing, scratchy throat, watery and itchy eyes, and difficulty breathing.

Persons experiencing questionable or severe symptoms should seek professional medical advice.

Scientific studies have linked fine particulate matter (smoke) with significant health problems, including premature death, respiratory related hospital admissions, aggravated asthma, acute respiratory symptoms (including severe chest pain, gasping, and aggravated coughing) chronic bronchitis, decreased
lung function, and work and school absences. In addition, all open burning is prohibited during this period.

Please see additional resources below:

AirNow Wildfire Map

Please see the excerpt below from How Smoke from Fires Can Affect Your Health – airnow

Use common sense to guide your activities. Even if you don’t have a monitor in your area, if it looks or smells smoky outside, it’s probably not a good time to mow the lawn or go for a run. And it’s probably not a good time for children – especially children with asthma – to be vigorously active outdoors, or active outdoors for prolonged periods of time. If you are active outdoors, pay attention to symptoms. Symptoms are an indication that you need to reduce exposure.

Dust masks aren’t enough! Paper “dust” masks or surgical masks will not protect your lungs from the fine particles in wildfire smoke. Scarves or bandanas (wet or dry) won’t help, either. Particulate masks known as N-95 or P-100 respirators will help, but they must fit well and be used correctly. They are sold at many hardware and home repair stores and online.

If you are advised to stay indoors, take steps to keep indoor air as clean as possible. Keep your windows and doors closed – unless it’s extremely hot outside. Run your air conditioner, if you have one. Keep the filter clean to prevent bringing additional smoke inside. Open windows to air out the house when air quality improves. Note: If you don’t have an air conditioner, staying inside with the windows closed may be dangerous in extremely hot weather. In these cases, seek alternative shelter, such as with relatives or a cleaner air shelter.

Help keep particle levels inside lower. When smoke is heavy for a prolonged period of time, fine particles can build up indoors even though you may not be able to see them. Try to avoid using anything that burns, such as wood fireplaces, gas logs, gas stoves – and even candles. Don’t vacuum. That stirs up particles already inside your home. And don’t smoke. That puts even more pollution in your lungs, and in the lungs of people around you.

If you have asthma or another lung disease, make sure you follow your healthcare provider’s directions about taking your medicines and following your asthma action plan. Have at least a five-day supply of medication on hand. Call your healthcare provider if your symptoms worsen.

If you have cardiovascular disease, follow your healthcare provider’s directions and call if your symptoms worsen. If you think you are having a heart attack or stroke, dial 9-1-1.